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The Oxford Encyclopedia of the History of Psychology

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the History of Psychology

Contemporary psychology is characterized by complexity of ideas, multiple modes of investigation, and an incredible diversity of topics. The history of psychology provides us with the necessary foundation for understanding our current science and profession, while also revealing alternative paths and suggesting new directions. The Oxford Encyclopedia of the History of Psychology addresses multiple facets of the historical development of psychology. Included are the range of theory, methods, and tools that have guided the emergence of the scientific discipline of psychology gradually as it emerged in the last third of the 19th century. The in-depth scholarly articles cover topics and are written by authors drawn from around the world, yielding insights and understanding from multiple cultural and intellectual traditions. All of the articles appear online as part of the Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Psychology.

Volume Editor

 Wade Pickren, Ithaca College

Associate Editors

 Peter Hegarty, University of Surrey

 Cheryl Logan, The University of North Carolina, Greensboro

 Wahbie Long, University of Cape Town

 Petteri Pietikainen, University of Oulu

 Alexandra Rutherford, York University

Topics

Historiography: Metatheoretical Approaches to the History of Psychology

Diverse Cultures, Diverse Origins

Methods and Measurement in the History of Psychology

Foundations of Scientific Psychology

Selves and Subjectivities

Minds, Bodies, Brains

Sociality

Development

Cognitivism

Health

The Person in Psychology

Order and Disorder in Psychological Functioning

Practices of Psychology

Non-Human Animals and the History of Psychology

Spatial and Material Culture of Psychology

Histories of Indigenous and Post-Colonial Psychologies

Psychology and the Political